Mike Pinay Qu’Appelle Indian Residential School 1953-1963  “It was the worst ten years of my life. I was away from my family from the age of 6 to 16. How do you learn about family? I didn’t know what love was. We weren’t even known by names back then. I was a number.”  “Do you remember your number?”  “73.”    Inquire about this image
       
     
 Valerie Ewenin Muskowekwan Indian Residential School 1965-1971  “I was brought up believing in the nature ways, burning sweetgrass, speaking Cree. And then I went to residential school and all that was taken away from me. And then later on, I forgot it, too, and that was even worse.”   Inquire about this image
       
     
 This picturesque little village is Lebret, Saskatchewan -- home to the Qu'Appelle Indian Residential School, which operated under the federal government and Catholic Church from 1884-1969, and under the governance of the Star Blanket Cree Nation from 1973-1998. While most of the original school structures have been demolished, one building remains, visible on the far right side of the photo.   Inquire about this image
       
     
 Marcel Ellery Marieval Indian Residential School 1987-1990  “I ran away 27 times. But the RCMP always found us eventually. When I got out, I turned to booze because of the abuse. I drank to suppress what had happened to me, to deal with my anger, to deal with my pain, to forget. Ending up in jail was easy, because I’d already been there.”    Inquire about this image
       
     
 A swingset in Beauval, Saskatchewan, near the former site of the Beauval Indian Residential School.   Inquire about this image
       
     
 Seraphine Kay Qu’Appelle Indian Residential School 1974-1975  “I was raped at school. He was an old man, the janitor. I didn’t tell anyone for decades, because I thought people would judge me. The only person I ever told was my mother [who went to Muskowekwan Residential School]. All she said was, ‘That’s how I was brought up, too.’”    Inquire about this image
       
     
 Gary Edwards Ile-a-la-Crosse Indian Residential School (1970-1973) St. Michael’s Indian Residential School (1974-1976) Qu’Appelle Indian Residential School (1976-1978)  “I remember after mass every Monday, the head priest would set a large mason jar on the podium. He and two helpers would lock the church doors, and then put on those 1930s canister gas masks. Then they’d open the mason jars and just watch us. We never knew what was happening, but within a few minutes kids would start vomiting or twitching or foaming at the mouth. Looking back, I don’t know, but I think it was mustard gas.”    Inquire about this image
       
     
 Most of the original residential school buildings have been destroyed, but this one — once Muskowekwan Indian Residential School — is still standing, and was even used as an administrative office building for a few years. Now, the building is largely in ruins. This piano may be one of the only surviving relics from when the building was a school.    Inquire about this image
       
     
 Victor Mispounas Beauval Indian Residential School 1955-1964    Inquire about this image
       
     
 Rick Pelletier Qu’Appelle Indian Residential School 1965-1966  “My parents came to visit and I told them I was being beaten. My teachers said that I had an active imagination, so they didn’t believe me at first. But after summer break they tried to take me back, and I cried and cried and cried. I ran away the first night, and when my grandparents went to take me back, I told them I’d keep running away, that I’d walk back to Regina if I had to. They believed me then.”    Inquire about this image
       
     
 The ruins of the Muskowekwan Indian Residential School.  Inquire about this image
       
     
 Glen Ewenin Gordon Indian Residential School (1970-1973) Muskowekwan Indian Residential School (1973-1975)  “Residential school affects how you see the world. I can’t fit into the public anymore, I don’t feel like a normal person. ... I don’t even notice myself teaching my kids to be afraid of authority. But it’s made me such a negative person. It changes everything.”    Inquire about this image
       
     
 A tipi stands outside the George Gordon First Nation band office. Gordon Indian Residential School in Punnichy, Saskatchewan was the last residential school shut down in Canada in 1996. The school was particularly notorious for reports of sexual abuse, with an administrator who has admitted to assaulting hundreds of boys during his nearly 40 years of working in schools throughout Canada.   Inquire about this image
       
     
 Audrey Eyahpase St. Michael’s Indian Residential School (1963-1965) Prince Albert Indian Residential School (1965-1974)  “I fought like hell all the time. The nuns would try to drag us away and they’d try to touch me. But I fought back, so they’d throw me in the cellar as punishment. But I loved it down there. It was quiet and dark and no one could bother me. ... This nun used to take a broomstick and shove it down there. She did it to all of us. How can you sing to God and treat us like that?”    Inquire about this image
       
     
 Jimmy Kevin Sayer Muskowekwan Indian Residential School 1983-1984  “I’ve spent half my life incarcerated, and I blame residential school for that. But I also know I have to give up my hate because I’m responsible for myself. I have three adult daughters and I was in jail for the duration of their childhoods. I have a 2 year old son now and I need to be there for him. I have to be different.”    Inquire about this image
       
     
 A stop sign hangs on the Muskowekwan Reserve in Saskwatchewan, just a couple miles from the ruins of the Muskowekwan Indian Residential School.   Inquire about this image
       
     
 White Buffalo Woman Muskowekwan Indian Residential School 1988-1990  “It’s just so hard for me to be happy. I still struggle hard with alcohol, and so I stay away from my family because I don’t want the to see me drunk. I’ve become a stranger to them — I don’t know how to be part of a family.”    Inquire about this image
       
     
 The interior of the Muskowekwan Indian Residential School, one of the last residential school buildings still standing in Saskatchewan.    Inquire about this image
       
     
 Leona Liberty Muskowekwan Indian Residential School 1960-1966  “My mother and her siblings went to school [at Muskowekwan] too. When my mom’s sister was 7 years old, she was pushed down a flight of stairs by a nun and broke her back. She died instantly. All of the kids were terrified that the same thing would happen to them. My mother didn’t tell me her story until 1993, when she was crippled by arthritis and at the end of her life. It finally became clear why she had never been able to care for me — when I was two weeks old, she abandoned me in high grass on our reserve ... We all abuse each other this way. It’s what we were taught.”    Inquire about this image
       
     
 The only road from Beauval Indian Residential School (at least 50+ years ago, at the darkest point in the school's history), led straight to the Beaver River. Students regularly tried to run away, but either were too small to try to cross or drowned in the attempt.   Inquire about this image
       
     
 Rosalie Sewap Guy Hill Indian Residential School 1959-1969  “We had to pray every day and ask for forgiveness. But forgiveness for what? When I was 7 I started being abused by a priest and a nun. They’d come around after dark with a flashlight and would take away one of the little girls almost every night. ... You never really heal from that. I turned into an alcoholic and it’s taken me a long time to escape that. I can’t forgive them. Never.”    Inquire about this image
       
     
 Oreos Eriacho Ramah Elementary School (1961-1966) Ramah Dormitory (1966-1970)   “Your spirit is kind of broken when you’re told you’re not supposed to act like a Native American. We’ve lost our identity out here — my kids ask me who we are and I have nothing to give them. But I’m teaching my daughters how to hunt, how to cut up the meat, how to use plants. I hope it helps. These two people in white shirts and ties come by the house sometimes wanting to talk about Joseph Smith, and I say, ‘Not today…’”   Inquire about this image
       
     
 Mike Pinay Qu’Appelle Indian Residential School 1953-1963  “It was the worst ten years of my life. I was away from my family from the age of 6 to 16. How do you learn about family? I didn’t know what love was. We weren’t even known by names back then. I was a number.”  “Do you remember your number?”  “73.”    Inquire about this image
       
     

Mike Pinay
Qu’Appelle Indian Residential School
1953-1963

“It was the worst ten years of my life. I was away from my family from the age of 6 to 16. How do you learn about family? I didn’t know what love was. We weren’t even known by names back then. I was a number.”

“Do you remember your number?”

“73.” 

Inquire about this image

 Valerie Ewenin Muskowekwan Indian Residential School 1965-1971  “I was brought up believing in the nature ways, burning sweetgrass, speaking Cree. And then I went to residential school and all that was taken away from me. And then later on, I forgot it, too, and that was even worse.”   Inquire about this image
       
     

Valerie Ewenin
Muskowekwan Indian Residential School
1965-1971

“I was brought up believing in the nature ways, burning sweetgrass, speaking Cree. And then I went to residential school and all that was taken away from me. And then later on, I forgot it, too, and that was even worse.”

Inquire about this image

 This picturesque little village is Lebret, Saskatchewan -- home to the Qu'Appelle Indian Residential School, which operated under the federal government and Catholic Church from 1884-1969, and under the governance of the Star Blanket Cree Nation from 1973-1998. While most of the original school structures have been demolished, one building remains, visible on the far right side of the photo.   Inquire about this image
       
     

This picturesque little village is Lebret, Saskatchewan -- home to the Qu'Appelle Indian Residential School, which operated under the federal government and Catholic Church from 1884-1969, and under the governance of the Star Blanket Cree Nation from 1973-1998. While most of the original school structures have been demolished, one building remains, visible on the far right side of the photo.

Inquire about this image

 Marcel Ellery Marieval Indian Residential School 1987-1990  “I ran away 27 times. But the RCMP always found us eventually. When I got out, I turned to booze because of the abuse. I drank to suppress what had happened to me, to deal with my anger, to deal with my pain, to forget. Ending up in jail was easy, because I’d already been there.”    Inquire about this image
       
     

Marcel Ellery
Marieval Indian Residential School
1987-1990

“I ran away 27 times. But the RCMP always found us eventually. When I got out, I turned to booze because of the abuse. I drank to suppress what had happened to me, to deal with my anger, to deal with my pain, to forget. Ending up in jail was easy, because I’d already been there.” 

Inquire about this image

 A swingset in Beauval, Saskatchewan, near the former site of the Beauval Indian Residential School.   Inquire about this image
       
     

A swingset in Beauval, Saskatchewan, near the former site of the Beauval Indian Residential School.

Inquire about this image

 Seraphine Kay Qu’Appelle Indian Residential School 1974-1975  “I was raped at school. He was an old man, the janitor. I didn’t tell anyone for decades, because I thought people would judge me. The only person I ever told was my mother [who went to Muskowekwan Residential School]. All she said was, ‘That’s how I was brought up, too.’”    Inquire about this image
       
     

Seraphine Kay
Qu’Appelle Indian Residential School
1974-1975

“I was raped at school. He was an old man, the janitor. I didn’t tell anyone for decades, because I thought people would judge me. The only person I ever told was my mother [who went to Muskowekwan Residential School]. All she said was, ‘That’s how I was brought up, too.’” 

Inquire about this image

 Gary Edwards Ile-a-la-Crosse Indian Residential School (1970-1973) St. Michael’s Indian Residential School (1974-1976) Qu’Appelle Indian Residential School (1976-1978)  “I remember after mass every Monday, the head priest would set a large mason jar on the podium. He and two helpers would lock the church doors, and then put on those 1930s canister gas masks. Then they’d open the mason jars and just watch us. We never knew what was happening, but within a few minutes kids would start vomiting or twitching or foaming at the mouth. Looking back, I don’t know, but I think it was mustard gas.”    Inquire about this image
       
     

Gary Edwards
Ile-a-la-Crosse Indian Residential School (1970-1973)
St. Michael’s Indian Residential School (1974-1976)
Qu’Appelle Indian Residential School (1976-1978)

“I remember after mass every Monday, the head priest would set a large mason jar on the podium. He and two helpers would lock the church doors, and then put on those 1930s canister gas masks. Then they’d open the mason jars and just watch us. We never knew what was happening, but within a few minutes kids would start vomiting or twitching or foaming at the mouth. Looking back, I don’t know, but I think it was mustard gas.” 

Inquire about this image

 Most of the original residential school buildings have been destroyed, but this one — once Muskowekwan Indian Residential School — is still standing, and was even used as an administrative office building for a few years. Now, the building is largely in ruins. This piano may be one of the only surviving relics from when the building was a school.    Inquire about this image
       
     

Most of the original residential school buildings have been destroyed, but this one — once Muskowekwan Indian Residential School — is still standing, and was even used as an administrative office building for a few years. Now, the building is largely in ruins. This piano may be one of the only surviving relics from when the building was a school.


Inquire about this image

 Victor Mispounas Beauval Indian Residential School 1955-1964    Inquire about this image
       
     

Victor Mispounas
Beauval Indian Residential School
1955-1964 

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 Rick Pelletier Qu’Appelle Indian Residential School 1965-1966  “My parents came to visit and I told them I was being beaten. My teachers said that I had an active imagination, so they didn’t believe me at first. But after summer break they tried to take me back, and I cried and cried and cried. I ran away the first night, and when my grandparents went to take me back, I told them I’d keep running away, that I’d walk back to Regina if I had to. They believed me then.”    Inquire about this image
       
     

Rick Pelletier
Qu’Appelle Indian Residential School
1965-1966

“My parents came to visit and I told them I was being beaten. My teachers said that I had an active imagination, so they didn’t believe me at first. But after summer break they tried to take me back, and I cried and cried and cried. I ran away the first night, and when my grandparents went to take me back, I told them I’d keep running away, that I’d walk back to Regina if I had to. They believed me then.” 

Inquire about this image

 The ruins of the Muskowekwan Indian Residential School.  Inquire about this image
       
     

The ruins of the Muskowekwan Indian Residential School.
Inquire about this image

 Glen Ewenin Gordon Indian Residential School (1970-1973) Muskowekwan Indian Residential School (1973-1975)  “Residential school affects how you see the world. I can’t fit into the public anymore, I don’t feel like a normal person. ... I don’t even notice myself teaching my kids to be afraid of authority. But it’s made me such a negative person. It changes everything.”    Inquire about this image
       
     

Glen Ewenin
Gordon Indian Residential School (1970-1973)
Muskowekwan Indian Residential School (1973-1975)

“Residential school affects how you see the world. I can’t fit into the public anymore, I don’t feel like a normal person. ... I don’t even notice myself teaching my kids to be afraid of authority. But it’s made me such a negative person. It changes everything.” 

Inquire about this image

 A tipi stands outside the George Gordon First Nation band office. Gordon Indian Residential School in Punnichy, Saskatchewan was the last residential school shut down in Canada in 1996. The school was particularly notorious for reports of sexual abuse, with an administrator who has admitted to assaulting hundreds of boys during his nearly 40 years of working in schools throughout Canada.   Inquire about this image
       
     

A tipi stands outside the George Gordon First Nation band office. Gordon Indian Residential School in Punnichy, Saskatchewan was the last residential school shut down in Canada in 1996. The school was particularly notorious for reports of sexual abuse, with an administrator who has admitted to assaulting hundreds of boys during his nearly 40 years of working in schools throughout Canada.

Inquire about this image

 Audrey Eyahpase St. Michael’s Indian Residential School (1963-1965) Prince Albert Indian Residential School (1965-1974)  “I fought like hell all the time. The nuns would try to drag us away and they’d try to touch me. But I fought back, so they’d throw me in the cellar as punishment. But I loved it down there. It was quiet and dark and no one could bother me. ... This nun used to take a broomstick and shove it down there. She did it to all of us. How can you sing to God and treat us like that?”    Inquire about this image
       
     

Audrey Eyahpase
St. Michael’s Indian Residential School (1963-1965)
Prince Albert Indian Residential School (1965-1974)

“I fought like hell all the time. The nuns would try to drag us away and they’d try to touch me. But I fought back, so they’d throw me in the cellar as punishment. But I loved it down there. It was quiet and dark and no one could bother me. ... This nun used to take a broomstick and shove it down there. She did it to all of us. How can you sing to God and treat us like that?” 

Inquire about this image

 Jimmy Kevin Sayer Muskowekwan Indian Residential School 1983-1984  “I’ve spent half my life incarcerated, and I blame residential school for that. But I also know I have to give up my hate because I’m responsible for myself. I have three adult daughters and I was in jail for the duration of their childhoods. I have a 2 year old son now and I need to be there for him. I have to be different.”    Inquire about this image
       
     

Jimmy Kevin Sayer
Muskowekwan Indian Residential School 1983-1984

“I’ve spent half my life incarcerated, and I blame residential school for that. But I also know I have to give up my hate because I’m responsible for myself. I have three adult daughters and I was in jail for the duration of their childhoods. I have a 2 year old son now and I need to be there for him. I have to be different.” 

Inquire about this image

 A stop sign hangs on the Muskowekwan Reserve in Saskwatchewan, just a couple miles from the ruins of the Muskowekwan Indian Residential School.   Inquire about this image
       
     

A stop sign hangs on the Muskowekwan Reserve in Saskwatchewan, just a couple miles from the ruins of the Muskowekwan Indian Residential School.

Inquire about this image

 White Buffalo Woman Muskowekwan Indian Residential School 1988-1990  “It’s just so hard for me to be happy. I still struggle hard with alcohol, and so I stay away from my family because I don’t want the to see me drunk. I’ve become a stranger to them — I don’t know how to be part of a family.”    Inquire about this image
       
     

White Buffalo Woman
Muskowekwan Indian Residential School 1988-1990

“It’s just so hard for me to be happy. I still struggle hard with alcohol, and so I stay away from my family because I don’t want the to see me drunk. I’ve become a stranger to them — I don’t know how to be part of a family.” 

Inquire about this image

 The interior of the Muskowekwan Indian Residential School, one of the last residential school buildings still standing in Saskatchewan.    Inquire about this image
       
     

The interior of the Muskowekwan Indian Residential School, one of the last residential school buildings still standing in Saskatchewan. 

Inquire about this image

 Leona Liberty Muskowekwan Indian Residential School 1960-1966  “My mother and her siblings went to school [at Muskowekwan] too. When my mom’s sister was 7 years old, she was pushed down a flight of stairs by a nun and broke her back. She died instantly. All of the kids were terrified that the same thing would happen to them. My mother didn’t tell me her story until 1993, when she was crippled by arthritis and at the end of her life. It finally became clear why she had never been able to care for me — when I was two weeks old, she abandoned me in high grass on our reserve ... We all abuse each other this way. It’s what we were taught.”    Inquire about this image
       
     

Leona Liberty
Muskowekwan Indian Residential School
1960-1966

“My mother and her siblings went to school [at Muskowekwan] too. When my mom’s sister was 7 years old, she was pushed down a flight of stairs by a nun and broke her back. She died instantly. All of the kids were terrified that the same thing would happen to them. My mother didn’t tell me her story until 1993, when she was crippled by arthritis and at the end of her life. It finally became clear why she had never been able to care for me — when I was two weeks old, she abandoned me in high grass on our reserve ... We all abuse each other this way. It’s what we were taught.” 

Inquire about this image

 The only road from Beauval Indian Residential School (at least 50+ years ago, at the darkest point in the school's history), led straight to the Beaver River. Students regularly tried to run away, but either were too small to try to cross or drowned in the attempt.   Inquire about this image
       
     

The only road from Beauval Indian Residential School (at least 50+ years ago, at the darkest point in the school's history), led straight to the Beaver River. Students regularly tried to run away, but either were too small to try to cross or drowned in the attempt.

Inquire about this image

 Rosalie Sewap Guy Hill Indian Residential School 1959-1969  “We had to pray every day and ask for forgiveness. But forgiveness for what? When I was 7 I started being abused by a priest and a nun. They’d come around after dark with a flashlight and would take away one of the little girls almost every night. ... You never really heal from that. I turned into an alcoholic and it’s taken me a long time to escape that. I can’t forgive them. Never.”    Inquire about this image
       
     

Rosalie Sewap
Guy Hill Indian Residential School
1959-1969

“We had to pray every day and ask for forgiveness. But forgiveness for what? When I was 7 I started being abused by a priest and a nun. They’d come around after dark with a flashlight and would take away one of the little girls almost every night. ... You never really heal from that. I turned into an alcoholic and it’s taken me a long time to escape that. I can’t forgive them. Never.” 

Inquire about this image

 Oreos Eriacho Ramah Elementary School (1961-1966) Ramah Dormitory (1966-1970)   “Your spirit is kind of broken when you’re told you’re not supposed to act like a Native American. We’ve lost our identity out here — my kids ask me who we are and I have nothing to give them. But I’m teaching my daughters how to hunt, how to cut up the meat, how to use plants. I hope it helps. These two people in white shirts and ties come by the house sometimes wanting to talk about Joseph Smith, and I say, ‘Not today…’”   Inquire about this image
       
     

Oreos Eriacho
Ramah Elementary School (1961-1966)
Ramah Dormitory (1966-1970) 

“Your spirit is kind of broken when you’re told you’re not supposed to act like a Native American. We’ve lost our identity out here — my kids ask me who we are and I have nothing to give them. But I’m teaching my daughters how to hunt, how to cut up the meat, how to use plants. I hope it helps. These two people in white shirts and ties come by the house sometimes wanting to talk about Joseph Smith, and I say, ‘Not today…’”

Inquire about this image